Statistical information Mexico 2000Mexico

Map of Mexico | Geography | People | Government | Economy | Energy | Communication
Military | Transportation | Transnational Issues | Year:  | More stats

Mexico in the World
Mexico in the World

Condor


Mexico - Introduction 2000
top of page


Background: The site of advanced Amerindian civilizations Mexico came under Spanish rule for three centuries before achieving independence early in the 19th century. A devaluation of the peso in late 1994 threw Mexico into economic turmoil triggering the worst recession in over half a century. The nation continues to make an impressive recovery. Ongoing economic and social concerns include low real wages underemployment for a large segment of the population inequitable income distribution and few advancement opportunities for the largely Amerindian population in the impoverished southern states.


Mexico - Geography 2000
top of page


Location: Middle America bordering the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico between Belize and the US and bordering the North Pacific Ocean between Guatemala and the US

Geographic coordinates: 23 00 N 102 00 W

Map referenceNorth America

Area
Comparative: slightly less than three times the size of Texas

Land boundaries

Coastline: 9,330 km

Maritime claims

Climate: varies from tropical to desert

Terrain: high rugged mountains; low coastal plains; high plateaus; desert

Elevation

Natural resources: petroleum silver copper gold lead zinc natural gas timber
Land use

Land use

Irrigated land: 61,000 km² (1993 est.)

Major rivers

Major watersheds area km²

Total water withdrawal

Total renewable water resources

Natural hazards: tsunamis along the Pacific coast volcanoes and destructive earthquakes in the center and south and hurricanes on the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean coasts

Geography
Note: strategic location on southern border of US


Mexico - People 2000
top of page


Population: 100,349,766 (July 2000 est.)
Growth rate: 1.53% (2000 est.)
Below poverty line: 27% (1998 est.)

Nationality

Ethnic groups: mestizo (Amerindian-Spanish) 60% Amerindian or predominantly Amerindian 30% white 9% other 1%

Languages: Spanish various Mayan Nahuatl and other regional indigenous languages

Religions: nominally Roman Catholic 89% Protestant 6% other 5%

Demographic profile
Age structure

Age structure

Dependency ratios

Median age

Population growth rate: 1.53% (2000 est.)

Birth rate: 23.15 births/1000 population (2000 est.)

Death rate: 5.05 deaths/1000 population (2000 est.)

Net migration rate: -2.84 migrant(s)/1000 population (2000 est.)

Population distribution

Urbanization

Major urban areas

Environment
Current issues: natural fresh water resources scarce and polluted in north inaccessible and poor quality in center and extreme southeast; raw sewage and industrial effluents polluting rivers in urban areas; deforestation; widespread erosion; desertification; serious air pollution in the national capital and urban centers along US-Mexico border

Air pollutants

Sex ratio

Mothers mean age at first birth

Maternal mortality ratio

Infant mortality rate: 26.19 deaths/1000 live births (2000 est.)

Life expectancy at birth

Total fertility rate: 2.67 children born/woman (2000 est.)

Contraceptive prevalence rate

Drinking water source

Current health expenditure

Physicians density

Hospital bed density

Sanitation facility access

Hiv/Aids

Major infectious diseases

Obesity adult prevalence rate

Alcohol consumption

Tobacco use

Children under the age of 5 years underweight

Education expenditures

Literacy

School life expectancy primary to tertiary education

Youth unemployment


Mexico - Government 2000
top of page


Country name

Government type: federal republic

Capital: Mexico

Administrative divisions: 31 states (estados singular - estado) and 1 federal district* (distrito federal); Aguascalientes Baja California Baja California Sur Campeche Chiapas Chihuahua Coahuila de Zaragoza Colima Distrito Federal* Durango Guanajuato Guerrero Hidalgo Jalisco Mexico Michoacan de Ocampo Morelos Nayarit Nuevo Leon Oaxaca Puebla Queretaro de Arteaga Quintana Roo San Luis Potosi Sinaloa Sonora Tabasco Tamaulipas Tlaxcala Veracruz-Llave Yucatan Zacatecas

Dependent areas

Independence: 16 September 1810 (from Spain)

National holiday: Independence Day 16 September (1810)

Constitution: 5 February 1917

Legal system: mixture of US constitutional theory and civil law system; judicial review of legislative acts; accepts compulsory ICJ jurisdiction with reservations

International law organization participation

Citizenship

Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal and compulsory (but not enforced)

Executive branch

Legislative branch: bicameral National Congress or Congreso de la Union consists of the Senate or Camara de Senadores (128 seats; half are elected by popular vote to serve six-year terms and half are allocated on the basis of each party's popular vote) and the Federal Chamber of Deputies or Camara Federal de Diputados (500 seats; 300 members are directly elected by popular vote to serve three-year terms; remaining 200 members are allocated on the basis of each party's popular vote also for three-year terms)

Judicial branch: Supreme Court of Justice or Corte Suprema de Justicia judges are appointed by the president with consent of the Senate

Political parties and leaders: Convergence for Democracy or CD [Dante DELGADO Ranauro]; Institutional Revolutionary Party or PRI [Dulce Maria SAURI Riancho]; Mexican Green Ecological Party or PVEM [Jorge GONZALEZ Torres]; National Action Party or PAN [Luis Felipe BRAVO Mena]; Party of the Democratic Center or PCD [Manuel CAMACHO Solis]; Party of the Democratic Revolution or PRD [Amalia GARCIA Medina]; Party of the Mexican Revolution or PARM [leader NA]; Party of the Nationalist Society or PSN [Gustavo RIOJAIS Santana]; Social Alliance Party or PAS [Jose Antonio CALDERON Cardoso]; Social Democratic Party or PDS [Gilberto RINCON Gallardo]; Workers Party or PT [Alberto ANAYA Gutierrez]

International organization participation: APEC BCIE BIS Caricom (observer) CCC CDB EBRD ECLAC FAO G-3 G-6 G-11 G-15 G-19 G-24 IADB IAEA IBRD ICAO ICC ICFTU ICRM IDA IEA (observer) IFAD IFC IFRCS ILO IMF IMO Inmarsat Intelsat Interpol IOC IOM (observer) ISO ITU LAES LAIA NAM (observer) NEA OAS OECD OPANAL OPCW PCA RG UN UNCTAD UNESCO UNIDO UNU UPU WCL WFTU WHO WIPO WMO WToO WTrO

Diplomatic representation

Flag descriptionflag of Mexico: three equal vertical bands of green (hoist side) white and red; the coat of arms (an eagle perched on a cactus with a snake in its beak) is centered in the white band

National symbols

National anthem

National heritage


Mexico - Economy 2000
top of page


Economy overview: Mexico has a free market economy with a mixture of modern and outmoded industry and agriculture increasingly dominated by the private sector. The number of state-owned enterprises in Mexico has fallen from more than 1000 in 1982 to fewer than 200 in 1999. The ZEDILLO administration is privatizing and expanding competition in sea ports railroads telecommunications electricity natural gas distribution and airports. A strong export sector helped to cushion the economy's decline in 1995 and led the recovery in 1996-99. Private consumption became the leading driver of growth accompanied by increased employment and higher wages. Mexico still needs to overcome many structural problems as it strives to modernize its economy and raise living standards. Income distribution is very unequal with the top 20% of income earners accounting for 55% of income. Trade with the US and Canada has nearly doubled since NAFTA was implemented in 1994. Mexico is pursuing additional trade agreements with most countries in Latin America and has signed a free trade deal with the EU to lessen its dependence on the US. The government is pursuing conservative economic policies in 2000 to avoid another end-of-term economic crisis but it still projects an economic growth rate of 4.5% because of the strong US economy and high oil prices.

Real gdp purchasing power parity

Real gdp growth rate: 3.7% (1999 est.)

Real gdp per capita ppp

Gross national saving
Gdp composition by sector of origin

Gdp composition by end use

Gdp composition by sector of origin

Agriculture products: corn wheat soybeans rice beans cotton coffee fruit tomatoes; beef poultry dairy products; wood products

Industries: food and beverages tobacco chemicals iron and steel petroleum mining textiles clothing motor vehicles consumer durables tourism

Industrial production growth rate: 4% (1999 est.)

Labor force: 38.6 million (1999)
By occupation agriculture: 24%
By occupation industry: 21%
By occupation services: 55% (1997)
Labor force

Unemployment rate: 2.5% urban (1998); plus considerable underemployment

Youth unemployment

Population below poverty line: 27% (1998 est.)

Gini index

Household income or consumption by percentage share

Distribution of family income gini index

Budget

Public debt

Taxes and other revenues

Revenue

Fiscal year: calendar year

Current account balance

Inflation rate consumer prices: 15% (1999 est.)

Central bank discount rate

Commercial bank prime lending rate

Stock of narrow money

Stock of broad money

Stock of domestic credit

Market value of publicly traded shares

Current account balance

Exports: $136.8 billion (f.o.b. 1999) includes in-bond industries (assembly plant operations with links to US companies)
Commodities: manufactured goods oil and oil products silver coffee cotton
Partners: US 89.3% Canada 1.7% Spain 0.6% Japan 0.5% Venezuela 0.3% Chile 0.3% Brazil 0.3% (1999 est.)

Imports: $142.1 billion (f.o.b. 1999) includes in-bond industries (assembly plant operations with links to US companies)
Commodities: metal-working machines steel mill products agricultural machinery electrical equipment car parts for assembly repair parts for motor vehicles aircraft and aircraft parts
Partners: US 74.8% Germany 3.8% Japan 3.5% Canada 1.9% South Korea 2% Italy 1.3% France 1% (1999 est.)

Reserves of foreign exchange and gold

Debt external: $155.8 billion (1999)

Stock of direct foreign investment at home

Stock of direct foreign investment abroad

Exchange rates: Mexican pesos (Mex$) per US$1 - 9.4793 (January 2000) 9.5604 (1999) 9.1360 (1998) 7.9185 (1997) 7.5994(1996) 6.4194 (1995)


Mexico - Energy 2000
top of page


Electricity access

Electricity production: 176.055 billion kWh (1998)

Electricity consumption: 164.767 billion kWh (1998)

Electricity exports: 11 million kWh (1998)

Electricity imports: 1.047 billion kWh (1998)

Electricity installed generating capacity

Electricity transmission distribution losses

Electricity generation sources

Petroleum

Refined petroleum

Natural gas

Carbon dioxide emissions

Energy consumption per capita


Mexico - Communication 2000
top of page


Telephones fixed lines

Telephones mobile cellular: 2.02 million (1998)

Telephone system: highly developed system with extensive microwave radio relay links; privatized in December 1990; opened to competition January 1997

Broadcast media

Internet country code

Internet users

Broadband fixed subscriptions


Mexico - Military 2000
top of page


Military expenditures
Dollar figure: $4 billion (FY99)
Percent of gdp: 1% (FY99)

Military and security forces

Military service age and obligation

Terrorist groups


Mexico - Transportation 2000
top of page


National air transport system

Civil aircraft registration country code prefix

Airports: 1806 (1999 est.)

Airports with paved runways

Airports with unpaved runways

Heliports: 2 (1999 est.)

Pipelines: crude oil 28,200 km; petroleum products 10,150 km; natural gas 13,254 km; petrochemical 1400 km

Railways

Roadways

Waterways: 2,900 km navigable rivers and coastal canals

Merchant marine

Ports and terminals


Mexico - Transnational issues 2000
top of page


Disputes international: none

Refugees and internally displaced persons

Illicit drugs: illicit cultivation of opium poppy (cultivation in 1998 - 5,500 hectares; potential production - 60 metric tons) and cannabis cultivation in 1998 - 4,600 hectares; government eradication efforts have been key in keeping illicit crop levels low; major supplier of heroin and marijuana to the US market; continues as the primary transshipment country for US-bound cocaine from South America; involved in the production and distribution of methamphetamines; upsurge in drug-related violence and official corruption; major drug syndicates growing more powerful


Trusted Tours


You found a piece of the puzzle

Please click here to complete it